Disability Issues/Assistance

    Results: 35

  • ADA Implementation Assistance (3)
    TP-4000.3250-050

    ADA Implementation Assistance

    TP-4000.3250-050

    Programs that provide assistance for organizations that are in the process of implementing the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and have questions regarding its requirements.
  • Adapted Clothing (1)
    BM-6500.1500-050

    Adapted Clothing

    BM-6500.1500-050

    Programs that pay for or provide clothing which has been customized for nursing facility residents, wheelchair users, surgical patients and people with special clothing needs due to stroke, paralysis, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease or other disabilities that make it difficult for them to dress or find attractive clothing that fits properly.
  • Adult Residential Care Homes (7)
    BH-8400.6000-040

    Adult Residential Care Homes

    BH-8400.6000-040

    Residential homes or facilities that offer personal care and individual attention for older adults, people with disabilities and other populations whose limitations prevent them from living alone. Adult residential care homes (which are also known as board and care homes, residential board and care homes, personal care homes or residential care facilities for the elderly) generally provide a room (which may be shared), meals and supervision; and may specialize in populations with specific needs such as people with Alzheimer's disease or those with developmental disabilities. Services vary from facility to facility but may include dietary and housekeeping services, monitoring of prescription medication, social and recreational opportunities, incontinence care and assistance with toileting, bathing, grooming, dressing, mobility and other activities of daily living. Some homes provide secured surroundings for confused elderly adults who may wander while others are unable to accept individuals who are incontinent or who have severe problems with memory loss. There is considerable variation among these homes in terms of size, resident mix, daily charges and services. Most but not all adult residential care homes or facilities are licensed by the state in which they are located.
  • Assistive Technology Equipment (6)
    LH-0600

    Assistive Technology Equipment

    LH-0600

    Programs that pay for or provide equipment, appliances and assistive aids that enable people, including those who have physical or sensory limitations, to increase their mobility and/or ability to communicate and live more comfortably.
  • Assistive Technology Equipment Sales (1)
    LH-0650.0500

    Assistive Technology Equipment Sales

    LH-0650.0500

    Programs that sell new, used and/or reconditioned assistive technology products on a retail or discount basis.
  • Brain Injuries (4)
    YF-3000.1300

    Brain Injuries

    YF-3000.1300

    Any of a variety of conditions that are characterized by significant destruction of brain tissue and resultant loss of brain function which include Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke and other cerebrovascular accidents, traumatic brain injury, post infection damage, brain tumors and permanent damage that occurs as a result of seizures, substance toxicity or other disorders.
  • Brain Injury Assessment (1)
    LF-4900.1200

    Brain Injury Assessment

    LF-4900.1200

    Programs that conduct medical tests to determine the extent of brain injuries and the type of treatment and rehabilitation that are needed. Brain injuries may be hereditary, congenital, degenerative or acquired. Acquired brain injuries include central nervous system injury from physical trauma, anoxia or hypoxic episodes and allergic conditions, toxic substances, and other acute medical/clinical incidents.
  • Centers for Independent Living (1)
    LR-1550

    Centers for Independent Living

    LR-1550

    Consumer controlled, community based, cross disability, nonresidential agencies designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities that provide an array of independent living services. All CILs provide four core services: information and referral, independent living skills training, peer counseling, and individual and systems advocacy. In addition, many CILs also offer transportation services, mobility training, personal assistance, housing and home modifications, recreation services, vocational programs, assistance in obtaining assistive technology equipment and other individualized services designed to increase and maintain independence.
  • Companion Dogs (2)
    LR-7950.1500-150

    Companion Dogs

    LR-7950.1500-150

    Programs that provide and train recipients in the use of dogs who have been taught to pick up dropped items, carry backpacks for books and other valuables, push elevator buttons, pull wheelchairs up hills or over curbs and provide other types of personal assistance including companionship and protection for people who have physical disabilities.
  • Day Treatment for Adults With Developmental Disabilities (2)
    LR-3100.1750

    Day Treatment for Adults With Developmental Disabilities

    LR-3100.1750

    Programs that provide diagnostic, treatment and habilitative services for adults with developmental disabilities. The programs may be available on a full or part day basis; focus on self-care, socialization, communication, independent living, functional academics and prevocational skills to maximize independence; and include speech and language therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nutritional services, psychological services and other clinical services as needed.
  • Developmental Disabilities Social/Recreational Programs (1)
    LR-3100.1800-190

    Developmental Disabilities Social/Recreational Programs

    LR-3100.1800-190

    Community-based day programs that provide training in community integration and self-advocacy specifically as they relate to recreation and leisure pursuits. Participants are generally adults age 18-22 with developmental disabilities who are still in school and desire an after-school program or are older than age 22 but are not working or are working part-time.
  • Disability Associations (1)
    TN-1700

    Disability Associations

    TN-1700

    Organizations whose members are individuals who work in the disability field and have affiliated for the purpose of promoting mutual interests, participating in education and training conferences, interacting with other professionals and taking advantage of other opportunities for personal and professional development. Many disability associations also include individuals with disabilities and their families in their membership. Disability associations may also advocate for the rights of people with disabilities and their caregivers; promote legislation that funds research and services for this population; and provide information for members and the general public. Included are associations that focus on a specific disability such as autism or brain injuries; and those that address a broad range of disability issues.
  • Disability Related Sports (3)
    PL-7000.3150

    Disability Related Sports

    PL-7000.3150

    Programs that provide opportunities for people of all ages with functional or cognitive disabilities to learn, become competitive in and enjoy a wide variety of recreational activities and sports, many of which are played in wheelchairs or have otherwise been modified to accommodate the athletes' disabilities.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (8)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Equestrian Therapy (6)
    RP-8000.1925

    Equestrian Therapy

    RP-8000.1925

    Programs that provide opportunities for individuals with any of a wide range of disabilities and others (e.g., victims of assault or abuse, people who have recently suffered a tragic loss, incarcerated offenders, at risk youth) to relate to, handle, groom and ride horses as a part of an experiential habilitation or therapy program in which the horse serves as a co-facilitator or co-therapist. Equestrian therapy provides an experience with horses that fosters growth, communication skills, self-esteem, self-awareness, healing and personal transformation. Clients learn about themselves and others by participating in activities with the horses, and then discussing feelings, behaviors and patterns. Therapy goals for different populations may differ, e.g., treatment for children with autism may focus on behavior modification and improvement.
  • Glasses/Contact Lenses (2)
    LH-0600.9000-250

    Glasses/Contact Lenses

    LH-0600.9000-250

    Programs that pay for or provide corrective lenses for people who have defective but correctable vision, or which provide vouchers which can be exchanged for glasses or contact lenses.
  • Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities (6)
    BH-8400.6000-280

    Group Residences for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-280

    Agency-owned or operated facilities that provide an alternative living environment for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional disabilities, multiple disabilities or chronic illnesses such as AIDS who are in need of personal services, supervision and/or assistance essential for self-protection or sustaining the activities of daily living and consequently are unable to live with their own families or in a more independent setting. Group residences for adults with disabilities may be licensed by the state and may be distinguished according to the level of service residents require. Service levels depend on the self-care skills residents possess, their limitations in the areas of physical coordination and mobility, and the presence and extent of behavior problems including disruptive or self-injurious behavior.
  • Hearing Aids (1)
    LH-0600.3000-300

    Hearing Aids

    LH-0600.3000-300

    Programs that pay for or provide amplification equipment for people who have impaired but correctable hearing. Included are hearing aids that are placed in the canal, in the ear (ITE or intraural), or behind the ear (BTE); eyeglasses aids; body aids; and vibrotactile aids which vibrate to assist the wearer to recognize speech and increase environmental awareness.
  • Home Barrier Evaluation/Removal Services (12)
    BH-3000.3500

    Home Barrier Evaluation/Removal Services

    BH-3000.3500

    Programs that provide assistance in the form of labor and supplies for people with disabilities who need to install ramps, elevators, stair glides or lifts; widen doorways; install grab bars in showers and bathrooms; lower kitchen and other cabinets; or make other modifications in their homes or apartments to make them accessible. Also included are programs that assess the accessibility of homes and apartments of people who have disabilities and make recommendations regarding necessary modifications.
  • Independent Living Skills Instruction (5)
    LR-3200

    Independent Living Skills Instruction

    LR-3200

    Programs that assist people who have disabilities to learn the basic skills of daily living through individual and group counseling and instruction, experience and practice in coping with real or simulated life situational demands; or through the use of assistive devices, special equipment and specialized assistants. Services include but are not limited to training in the ability to travel about the community alone; to live independently in a private residence; to maintain health through self-care and use of medical services; to live within personal income; to maintain acceptable grooming and appearance; to deal with legal, family or social problems; and to cope with other requirements for successful independent living.
  • Mobility Assistance Service Dogs (1)
    LR-7950.5000-500

    Mobility Assistance Service Dogs

    LR-7950.5000-500

    Programs that provide and train recipients in the use of service dogs who have been taught to pick up dropped items, carry backpacks for books and other valuables, operate light switches, push elevator buttons, ring doorbells, open and close doors, pull wheelchairs up hills or over curbs and provide other types of personal assistance for people with physical disabilities who have limited mobility. Some mobility assistance dogs serve as "walker dogs" who steady Parkinson’s patients and people recovering from an injury while walking. If the individual falls, the dog may also be trained to act as a brace to help the person regain their feet.
  • Occupational Therapy (3)
    LR-6200

    Occupational Therapy

    LR-6200

    Programs that evaluate the task performance skills of individuals who may be having difficulty engaging in self-care, work, play or leisure time activities and help people across the lifespan participate in the things they want and need to do through the therapeutic use of everyday activities (occupations). Occupational therapy services typically include an individualized evaluation, during which the individual/family and occupational therapist agree on the person's goals; customized intervention to improve the person's ability to perform daily activities and reach their goals; and an outcomes evaluation to ensure that the goals are being met. Common occupational therapy interventions include helping children with disabilities to participate fully in school and social situations, helping people recovering from injury to regain skills, and providing supports for older adults experiencing physical and cognitive changes.
  • Orientation and Mobility Training (2)
    LR-6400

    Orientation and Mobility Training

    LR-6400

    Programs that help people who are blind or who have visual impairments develop the fundamental spatial concepts and skills that are necessary for maximum mobility and independent living. Instruction focuses on moving safely and purposefully in the school, home or community environment; and usually includes procedures for street crossings, travel in unfamiliar areas, utilization of public transportation, and appropriate use of aids such as sighted guides or canes. Training for persons who want to acquire the skills to be a sighted guide may also be provided.
  • Planning/Coordinating/Advisory Groups (7)
    TD-6500

    Planning/Coordinating/Advisory Groups

    TD-6500

    Governing boards, advisory boards, commissions, committees and other groups that provide advice, guidance and, in some cases, formal oversight, for public and private organizations that are responsible for the provision of services to the community; that assess existing social conditions and problems and develop and assist in the implementation of specific strategies for meeting the human service needs of the community; and/or which assist community agencies and organizations to coordinate the provision of services in an efficient, nonduplicative way. Also included are entities that are composed of community agencies which have an established networking relationship that provides a collaborative approach to addressing specific identified community needs and problems.
  • Prosthetic Devices (1)
    LH-0600.6500-700

    Prosthetic Devices

    LH-0600.6500-700

    Programs that pay for or provide and train recipients in the use of artificial arms, hands, feet, legs and portions of legs, some of which are battery operated and utilize the movement of remaining muscle groups to control the strength and direction of motion.
  • Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities (6)
    FT-1000.6600

    Protection and Advocacy for Individuals With Disabilities

    FT-1000.6600

    Programs that provide assistance for individuals with disabilities who are having difficulty understanding and/or obtaining the full benefits and services to which they are entitled by law. Included are federally mandated programs that are part of the formal protection and advocacy system which includes Protection and Advocacy for Persons with Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection and Advocacy for Individual Rights (PAIR) and the Client Assistance Program (CAP); and independent organizations that provide the same types of services. Protection and advocacy programs provide legal representation and other advocacy services, under federal and state laws, for all people with disabilities and endeavor to ensure full access to inclusive educational programs, financial entitlements, health care, accessible housing and productive employment opportunities. The programs maintain a presence in facilities that care for people with disabilities where they monitor, investigate and attempt to remedy adverse conditions. CAP agencies (many of which are housed within protection and advocacy offices) provide information and assistance for individuals seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation services under the Rehabilitation Act, including assistance in pursuing administrative, legal and other appropriate remedies.
  • Reading Services for People With Disabilities (1)
    TJ-6750

    Reading Services for People With Disabilities

    TJ-6750

    Programs that provide people with visual impairments or other disabilities that limit their ability to read print material with access to recorded tapes, readings from current popular publications or a volunteer who reads for them. Included are radio reading services which offer programming that features highlights from national newspapers, articles from periodicals, or novels and other special interest reading material; telephone reading services which provide access to prerecorded material via touch-tone telephone; and programs that arrange for a call or visit by a volunteer reader.
  • Service Animals (1)
    LR-7950

    Service Animals

    LR-7950

    Programs that provide and train recipients in the use of animals who have been taught to help individuals who have disabilities increase their mobility and independence and/or maximize their ability to communicate effectively.
  • Sign Language Interpretation (1)
    PH-3500.8000

    Sign Language Interpretation

    PH-3500.8000

    Programs that offer the services of people who are proficient in sign language, one of a variety of communication systems in which hand and body movements represent words, ideas, objects, actions and other concepts, to help people who are deaf or have hearing impairments and hearing individuals communicate with one another. Included are programs for individuals who are proficient in American Sign Language (ASL), Quebec Sign Language (LSQ) as well as those who use systems like Signed Exact English (SEE), Conceptually Accurate Signed English (CASE) which involve manually coded English, signed French which involve manually coded French, cued speech in which words spoken by lips are supplemented by cues which aid speech reading, and oral transliteration in which words spoken by an individual are silently mouthed to the deaf person accompanied by appropriate facial expressions and gestures to facilitate conveyance of the information. Sign language interpreters interpret in two ways: voice-to-sign and sign-to-voice. Voice-to-sign means the interpreter is signing to the deaf person what the speaker is saying. Sign-to-voice means the interpreter is voicing to the hearing person what the deaf person is signing. Some individuals want an interpreter who can perform both roles. Others prefer to speak for themselves and limit the interpreter's role to signing to them.
  • Special Education Plan Development (1)
    HH-8000.8100

    Special Education Plan Development

    HH-8000.8100

    Programs that provide information, technical assistance and support which relates to the development, implementation, review and revision of Individual Education Programs (IEPs) for students with disabilities and/or Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs) for infants and toddlers with disabilities who are eligible for early intervention services. IEPs are written documents developed by a team that includes a child’s parents and school staff which lists, among other things, the special education services (including transition services) the child will receive. IFSPs document family involvement and early intervention services provided to infants and toddlers with disabilities. The programs may target special education professionals and or parents; and help parents participate more effectively in the process.
  • Special Library Collections (1)
    TJ-4500.8300

    Special Library Collections

    TJ-4500.8300

    Regular libraries or other organizations that acquire, house and make available to the community for purposes of research or appreciation, aggregations of printed works or manuscripts on a particular subject or by a particular author; artistic materials by a particular artist or representative of a particular era or style; or other collectibles that are rare, of special interest, of historical significance or of scholarly value. Also included are organizations that acquire, classify and make available to the community on a loan or distribution basis, special document collections or reading materials in a variety of language or special formats which enable people who have visual or hearing impairments or who read in a language other than English to enjoy leisure reading materials and selected nonfiction and reference works.
  • Speech and Hearing (4)
    LR-8000

    Speech and Hearing

    LR-8000

    Programs that provide comprehensive diagnostic and treatment services for individuals who have speech and/or language problems, neurological disorders or diseases or disorders of the middle, inner and outer ear; larynx; tongue; mouth; or other structures whose coordination and appropriate functioning are necessary for speech and/or hearing.
  • Speech and Language Evaluations (1)
    LR-8000.8000-800

    Speech and Language Evaluations

    LR-8000.8000-800

    Programs that establish the nature and extent of an individual's language and/or speech deficits in order to devise an appropriate treatment plan.
  • Speech Therapy (4)
    LR-8000.8000-820

    Speech Therapy

    LR-8000.8000-820

    Programs that offer individual or group therapy sessions which focus on the remediation of specific articulation problems in which speech sounds are omitted, replaced by substitute sounds or distorted; voice problems in which pitch, loudness or quality of voice is affected; or stuttering.
  • Supported Living Services for Adults With Disabilities (4)
    BH-8400.6000-840

    Supported Living Services for Adults With Disabilities

    BH-8400.6000-840

    Programs for adults with developmental disabilities, sensory impairments, physical disabilities, emotional problems or multiple disabilities who do not require 24-hour supervision that provide a highly individualized, coordinated system of services and supports which facilitates their ability to live in their own homes or apartments, to hire and supervise paid caregivers, to work in the community, to participate in community activities and to interact with nondisabled neighbors. A supported living agency may help the individual hire and supervise an attendant; develop a budget and pay bills on time; learn to shop and cook or hire someone to prepare meals for them; remember to take necessary medication; schedule medical appointments and get to the doctor's office; advertise for and select a roommate; make their living space barrier-free; learn about relationships, sexuality and parenting; select recreational pursuits that are personally satisfying; and accomplish other similar activities of daily living.
 
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