Children and Families

    Results: 49

  • Adolescent/Youth Counseling (16)
    RP-1400.8000-050

    Adolescent/Youth Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-050

    Programs that specialize in the treatment of adolescents, usually age 12 or 13 through 17, who have adjustment problems, behavior problems, emotional disturbance, a personality disorder or incipient mental illness. The programs may help youth troubled by low self-esteem, social isolation, peer pressure, bullying, school performance issues, truancy, anger management issues, family problems, grief and loss, sexual promiscuity, sexually transmitted disease, alcohol or drug addiction, eating disorders, oppositional and defiant behaviors, depression and anxiety, suicidal thoughts or other difficult issues.
  • Adoption Services (2)
    PH-0300

    Adoption Services

    PH-0300

    Programs that participate in arranging permanent homes under new legal parentage for individuals whose birth parents are unable or unwilling to provide for their care. Included are programs that provide counseling and assistance for people who decide to relinquish their children for adoption or arrange for an independent adoption; which recruit, select, counsel and match suitable adoptive parents with children who have been relinquished; which assist in the adoption of stepchildren, adults or foreign-born children; which provide foster care for children who have been relinquished for adoption but not yet placed; and/or which assist people who are adopted to locate their birth parents and birth parents to locate the children they relinquished.
  • Boys/Girls Clubs (1)
    PS-9800.1000

    Boys/Girls Clubs

    PS-9800.1000

    Programs that provide a wide range of supervised recreational activities and delinquency prevention services for children and youth of all ages and backgrounds, but particularly for disadvantaged youth, through membership in boys and/or girls clubs. Club members are entitled to use recreational facilities and may have access to counseling, tutorial services, employment assistance, gang programs, drug abuse and alcoholism prevention and other activities and services that direct their energies toward positive social goals and facilitate healthy personality development.
  • Child Abuse Counseling (7)
    RP-1400.8000-020.15

    Child Abuse Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-020.15

    Programs that provide therapeutic interventions for individuals and/or families who are experiencing child abuse including abandonment, neglect, or emotional, physical or sexual abuse by a parent, guardian, or other family or extended family member whom the child trusts and who is in a position of power over the child. Counseling is offered in a variety of settings and may include individual, conjoint, family and group therapy sessions for the child, the abusing or non-abusing parent(s) and siblings. Separate sessions may be available for young children who have been victimized and for older children in their teens.
  • Child Abuse Hotlines (1)
    RP-1500.1400-150

    Child Abuse Hotlines

    RP-1500.1400-150

    Programs that provide immediate assistance for parents who have abused or fear they may abuse their children with the objective of defusing the parent's anger and frustration and ensuring the child's future safety through referrals for ongoing support and treatment. Also included may be services for abused children and concerned others who are in need of advice, guidance and/or emotional support. Hotline staff are generally available via the telephone, email, live chat, texting and/or instant message (IM).
  • Child Abuse Medical Evaluations (1)
    LF-7000.1550

    Child Abuse Medical Evaluations

    LF-7000.1550

    Hospitals and clinics with multidisciplinary teams that conduct historical interviews and physical examinations of children to determine whether there are injuries or other forms of physical evidence that are consistent with neglect, emotional deprivation/failure to thrive, or physical or sexual abuse that constitute the battered child syndrome. Historical information supplied by the child in the medical interview may be used to establish a case for child abuse even in the absence of physical evidence.
  • Child Abuse Prevention (2)
    FN-1500.1900-150

    Child Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-150

    Programs, often offered in the schools or in other community settings, that attempt to protect children from physical, sexual and/or emotional abuse or exploitation through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with children and/or the community at large. The sessions may offer suggestions for children and/or parents regarding ways of avoiding or handling an abusive or potentially abusive situation and/or information about the indicators and incidence of abuse, requirements for reporting abuse and community resources that are available to children who have been abused and to their families.
  • Child Care Centers (9)
    PH-1250.1400

    Child Care Centers

    PH-1250.1400

    Programs that are licensed to provide supervised care within designated facilities for children during some portion of a 24-hour day. Staff for approved day care centers must meet defined educational requirements; the program must ensure specified adult/child ratios; and the facility must meet building, fire and zoning codes. Services may include recreational and developmental activities and snacks and/or meals, as appropriate.
  • Child Care Expense Assistance (2)
    NL-3000.1500

    Child Care Expense Assistance

    NL-3000.1500

    Programs that cover all or part of the cost of child care in public and licensed private child care centers or private family child care homes, usually for low-income families or families which include children with disabilities in situations where parents are working, in school or in a training program. Also included are programs that pay the costs of in-home or out-of-home child care when the parent is receiving diagnostic tests, undergoing medical treatment, is hospitalized or needs to be out of the house for other reasons; and those that provide financial assistance to families with young children to help cover some of the costs of a parent staying home to care for their child.
  • Child Care Provider Referrals (3)
    PH-2400.1500

    Child Care Provider Referrals

    PH-2400.1500

    Programs that provide statewide and community-based services that are designed to improve the availability and quality of child care. These programs maintain lists of child care resources and link families who are in need of child care services with child care centers, licensed family child care homes and other organization-based providers; provide information that helps families become good consumers of child care services; recruit new child care providers to expand the availability of the service locally; provide training and technical assistance for providers; and collect and disseminate data which document the demand for child care services and the current availability of child care resources. Some programs may also make referrals to preschools and many provide referrals to children's play groups.
  • Child Support Assistance/Enforcement (4)
    FT-3000.1600

    Child Support Assistance/Enforcement

    FT-3000.1600

    Programs that provide assistance which helps to ensure that parents fulfill their mutual obligation to financially support and provide health care for their children. Included are services for people who want to locate an absent parent; establish paternity; establish a child support order; request that the non-custodial parent provide health insurance for a child in conjunction with a child support order; change the amount of a child support award; dispute a child support award; or enforce payment of child support monies in cases where the supporting parent is delinquent in paying or refuses to pay or make health insurance arrangements altogether. Child support is money paid by one parent to another for the maintenance, including the education, of their children following the dissolution of their marriage or other relationship. Non-custodial parents enrolled in an insurance plan at work may be required to include the child under this coverage while those not covered by any insurance plan may be required to obtain medical coverage, if available at a reasonable cost. Child support assistance/enforcement may be provided by private attorneys, legal clinics, family law facilitators' offices or child support enforcement programs which are available in all states, often as a component of the district attorney's office.
  • Children's Protective Services (2)
    PH-6500.1500

    Children's Protective Services

    PH-6500.1500

    Programs that investigate reports of child abuse, neglect or abandonment; document substantiated cases; provide for the temporary placement of children who, for their own protection, have been removed from the custody of the adults who are responsible for their care; work with families who are experiencing a problem with child abuse with the objective of facilitating continued family unification or reunification; and provide ongoing supportive services for children in permanent placement.
  • Developmental Assessment (2)
    LF-7000.1700

    Developmental Assessment

    LF-7000.1700

    Programs that provide a comprehensive, structured evaluation of a child’s cognitive/intellectual functioning, language and communication skills, independent living skills, social and emotional development and perceptual/motor functioning in order to identify individuals who show developmental delays, determine the nature and extent of the problem and recommend a course of treatment and care. Developmental assessments are generally offered by a developmental assessment specialist, or a team of professionals that can include a pediatrician, language specialist, audiologist, occupational therapist, child psychologist and child psychiatrist, among others. They involve age-adjusted questions regarding a child's growth, physical movements, behavior, play, and interactions with family members and the rest of the world as well as a series of tests that may include a physical exam, hearing and eye screenings, play observation, and standardized tests that present the child with specific tasks to determine areas of strength and weakness. Developmental assessments are occasionally done for adults. They can also be used to identify individuals who have developmental disabilities such as intellectual disabilities, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, autism and neurological impairments, in order to establish eligibility for state and federally funded programs.
  • Domestic Violence Intervention Programs (2)
    FN-1500.9100-180

    Domestic Violence Intervention Programs

    FN-1500.9100-180

    Programs that offer classes or groups, sponsor victim panels or provide other interventions which help domestic violence offenders understand and take responsibility for their acts of violence and abuse; realize that their behavior is the result of their desire to gain power and control over their partner's life; and make a decision to stop their abuse by looking at the damaging effects of their actions on their relationships, partners, children and themselves. The group sessions address the tactics of power and control; describe the cycle of abuse; challenge stereotypical gender role expectations; and help abusers identify and articulate their feelings and recognize behavior, emotional and physical cues which signal escalating anger. Participants learn problem solving skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, stress management techniques, communication and listening skills and other skills that will help them develop and maintain positive, healthy partnerships; and may be ordered by the court to attend or self refer. The victim panels provide a venue which enables volunteers who have been subjected to abuse to describe the treatment they have endured and the impact on their lives.
  • Early Childhood Education (3)
    HD-1800

    Early Childhood Education

    HD-1800

    Programs that provide educational activities and experiences for children from birth to age five which are intended to foster social, physical, emotional and intellectual growth and prepare them for further formal learning.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (8)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Family Based Services (2)
    PH-2360

    Family Based Services

    PH-2360

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support healthy family development, improve the family's ability to resolve problems (such as poverty, unemployment, ill health, homelessness, substandard housing, educational difficulties, substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, delinquency and physical and developmental problems) and prevent the need for unnecessary placement of children in foster care, group homes, inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment programs, residential training schools or other alternative environments when family problems reach crisis proportions. Services may include home visiting services that focus on public health issues (especially prenatal), mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, success in a child care setting, parenting skills development, stress management, tutoring, pregnancy awareness and AIDS awareness; may be available to the community at large, to families at risk for dissolution or those currently in crisis; and may be offered by a single agency or a coalition of agencies that have agreed to provide services according to a coordinated case plan.
  • Family Counseling (48)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Literacy Programs (2)
    HH-4500.2000

    Family Literacy Programs

    HH-4500.2000

    Programs offered by libraries, local literacy councils and other organizations that provide reading, writing and mathematics instruction which targets both parents and children. Included are Even Start programs, federally-funded intergenerational literacy programs for low-income families with children age eight or younger which integrate early childhood education, adult basic education/literacy programs, ESL, GED, and parenting education with the objective of breaking the cycle of poverty and illiteracy and providing both adults and children with essential life skills. The programs build on existing resources; focus on family/parent literacy, parenting skills and child development; and combine the efforts of a variety of local organizations including Head Start programs, libraries, literacy councils, local educational agencies, institutions of higher education and other public and nonprofit entities. Support services may include transportation, child care, nutrition assistance, meals, health care and referrals for employment services, mental health services, substance abuse and other identified needs.
  • Family Planning (2)
    LJ-2000

    Family Planning

    LJ-2000

    Programs that provide assistance for people who want to control the size of their families and the spacing of their children, usually through some form of birth control; who want to explore options for conceiving; who have a problem with infertility; or who have questions about the advisability of becoming pregnant or following through with a current pregnancy.
  • Family Preservation Programs (4)
    PH-2360.2350

    Family Preservation Programs

    PH-2360.2350

    Programs that provide a variety of short-term, intensive, home-based intervention services for families experiencing a crisis that is so severe that children are at imminent risk for placement outside the family setting. Services, which are aimed at ameliorating the underlying causes of family dysfunction, are generally time-limited, of fairly short duration and available on a 24-hour basis. Also included are other family preservation program models whose programs vary in terms of the population served, the level of intensity of services provided and the length of services. The objective of family preservation programs is to preserve the family as a unit and prevent unnecessary placement of the children in foster care, a group home, an inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment program, a residential training school or other alternative living arrangement.
  • Family Support Centers/Outreach (1)
    PH-2360.2400

    Family Support Centers/Outreach

    PH-2360.2400

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support the healthy development of families, improve family interaction skills and help fragile families to resolve their problems at a pre-crisis stage before they become unmanageable. Services may be center-based or provided on an outreach basis to families who are initially reluctant to seek support and generally target the specific needs of a particular community. Included may be self-sufficiency programs which help families break the cycle of poverty by addressing the barriers to self-sufficiency; early child development and school success programs; programs which address the needs of teen parents; programs which target parents at risk for becoming abusive; programs for families with children who have special developmental needs and programs that focus on the maternal and child health care needs of first-time, expectant women whose babies are at high risk for low birth weight and infant mortality.
  • Family Violence Prevention (4)
    FN-1500.1900

    Family Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.1900

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abuse, elder abuse and spouse abuse in family settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Foster Grandparent Program (1)
    ND-9200.8000-200

    Foster Grandparent Program

    ND-9200.8000-200

    Programs that provide part-time opportunities for low-income individuals age 60 and older to serve as mentors, tutors and caregivers for abused or neglected children, troubled youth, or youngsters with disabilities or other special needs in schools, hospitals, child care programs, Head Start programs and residential settings. Foster grandparents receive a modest tax-free stipend for their work as well as reimbursements for their travel expenses, and have the satisfaction of helping young people grow, gain confidence, and become more productive members of society. Local nonprofit organizations and public agencies receive grants to sponsor and operate local Foster Grandparent projects. The Foster Grandparents Program is part of Senior Corps, a network of programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
  • Foster Home Placement (3)
    PH-2400.1900

    Foster Home Placement

    PH-2400.1900

    Programs that link individuals who are in need of alternative living arrangements with appropriate private family homes that are licensed to provide foster care. Licensing requirements vary from state to state and, in some situations, licensing is not required at all. Programs that provide placement services for children and adults with disabilities are generally also responsible for recruiting, training, certifying and monitoring placements in family homes and for providing support for the family and the individual(s) with disabilities who live with them.
  • GED/High School Equivalency Test Instruction (4)
    HH-0500.2500-250

    GED/High School Equivalency Test Instruction

    HH-0500.2500-250

    Programs that provide instruction for adults and eligible minors who have elected to take a series of tests which measure the extent to which they have gained the knowledge, skills and understanding ordinarily acquired through a high school education. Instruction and testing focus on writing, social studies, science, reading and mathematics. Individuals who pass the tests receive a high school equivalency certificate.
  • Guardianship Assistance (2)
    FT-6900.2500

    Guardianship Assistance

    FT-6900.2500

    Programs that provide assistance for people who are in favor of or want to oppose the appointment of a guardian to care for and/or manage the affairs of a child or adolescent during minority (generally younger than age 18). In some states, particularly those with no arrangements for conservatorships, whose conservatorships are voluntary covering property and powers designated by the conservatee or whose conservatorships address only the individual's estate, guardianships may also apply to adults who have been found by the courts to be incapable of managing their own affairs.
  • Head Start (3)
    HD-1800.3000

    Head Start

    HD-1800.3000

    A federally-funded child development program that provides educational experiences, medical and dental services, nutritional meals, counseling and opportunities for parental involvement to help prepare low-income children and children with disabilities age three to five to enter and succeed in school.
  • Infant Care Centers (1)
    PH-1250.3400

    Infant Care Centers

    PH-1250.3400

    Programs that provide substitute parental care in a group setting for infants and toddlers from birth to age two during some portion of a 24-hour day.
  • International Adoption (1)
    PH-0300.8100-350

    International Adoption

    PH-0300.8100-350

    Programs that specialize in handling adoptions of foreign-born children. International adoptions involve children who were born in a country other than that in which the adoptive parents reside or are citizens, or who are citizens of a country other than where they live. In addition to the normal state and federal laws that apply to all domestic adoptions, international adoptions are impacted by the laws of foreign countries and international treaties, and require approval by the country's immigration authorities.
  • Military Child Care (4)
    PH-1250.5000

    Military Child Care

    PH-1250.5000

    Programs located on military bases and supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) that provide substitute parental care for children of military personnel.
  • Military Family Service/Support Centers (7)
    TM-5100

    Military Family Service/Support Centers

    TM-5100

    Programs located at military installations throughout the world that handle inquiries from military personnel, retirees, reservists and their family members, do an assessment of their needs and refer them to sources of help available at the installation or in the local community. The centers may provide relocation assistance, transition assistance, family life programs (e.g., parenting, stress management), individual and family counseling, employment assistance, and financial management services as well as emergency assistance.
  • Military Family Support Groups (8)
    PN-8100.4500-550

    Military Family Support Groups

    PN-8100.4500-550

    Mutual support groups whose members are the spouses, children, parents, other relatives, boyfriends, girlfriends or friends of active duty military personnel who have needs, issues and problems that relate to the stresses of military life. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; help participants prepare for military mobilization or deployment; and allow them to share their experience, strengths and hopes to solve the problems they have in common and to address the quality of life issues that affect them all.
  • Parent Counseling (7)
    RP-1400.8000-650

    Parent Counseling

    RP-1400.8000-650

    Programs that provide a wide variety of therapeutic interventions for parents who are experiencing emotional difficulties or conflicts concerning their role as parents. Included are individual or group counseling for one or both parents or conjoint parent counseling which focuses on and explores the mental, emotional or social problems of the individual(s) which contribute to their parenting problems.
  • Parental Visitation Monitoring (1)
    PH-6000.6500

    Parental Visitation Monitoring

    PH-6000.6500

    Programs that provide supervised visitation for people ordered by the court to visit their minor children only in the presence of a neutral, responsible person. Also included are programs that link parents with people who are trained to act as monitors.
  • Parenting Education (19)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Parenting Helplines (2)
    PH-6100.6600

    Parenting Helplines

    PH-6100.6600

    Programs that operate a telephone counseling and information line that parents can call when they have childhood development questions, need advice regarding a specific parenting problem or need a referral for parenting resources.
  • Parenting Materials (1)
    PH-6100.6700

    Parenting Materials

    PH-6100.6700

    Programs that offer any of a wide variety of resources including books, audiotapes, video cassettes and learning games that provide information, techniques and suggestions for activities which enable parents to be more effective in their parenting role.
  • Parenting Skills Classes (2)
    PH-6100.6800

    Parenting Skills Classes

    PH-6100.6800

    Programs that teach skills that enable parents to deal constructively and consistently with a broad spectrum of child rearing problems which may include sibling rivalry; school behavior and performance; poor self-esteem; shyness; drug use; sexual promiscuity; and the whole range of negative, acting-out behaviors including whining, temper tantrums, disobedience, insolence and destructiveness. Some parenting skills development programs utilize a step-by-step approach for managing specific problems and may incorporate application at home of techniques that were discussed and practiced in the classroom setting. Other programs may offer participatory family workshops which provide opportunities for parents and children to learn and practice methods for dealing with one another under the guidance of a trained facilitator. Most training programs teach the parent a particular way of talking and relating to their children that reinforces positive behaviors and communication and decreases negative behaviors while supporting the development of a relationship that is built on fairness, mutual caring and respect.
  • Parenting/Family Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.6500

    Parenting/Family Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500

    Mutual support groups whose members are individuals who have experiences relating to adoption, birth control, family planning, pregnancy, childbirth, foster care, kinship care, marriage, parenting, separation/divorce, single parenting, step families, blended families, grandparent rights or other family situations. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share their experience, strengths and hopes, understand their relationships and work through related emotions.
  • Pregnancy/Childbirth Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.6500-680

    Pregnancy/Childbirth Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500-680

    Mutual support groups whose members are pregnant women or women who have had difficulties in areas relating to family planning, pregnancy and childbirth. Included are groups for individuals who are pregnant for the first time, women who are contemplating a home birth, breastfeeding women, families making decisions relating to birth control, women who have had a cesarean birth, women who are at high risk for a problem pregnancy and parents of premature or high-risk infants. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and provide an opportunity for participants to share their experience, strengths and hopes, understand their relationships and work through related emotions.
  • School Districts (5)
    HD-8200

    School Districts

    HD-8200

    Local administrative units that operate schools or contract for school services in specific geographical areas.
  • Scouting Programs (3)
    PS-9800.8500

    Scouting Programs

    PS-9800.8500

    Programs that provide opportunities for children and youth to develop individual and group initiative and responsibility, self-reliance, courage, personal fitness, discipline and other desirable qualities of character through participation in a wide range of organized recreational, educational and civic activities under the leadership of qualified adult volunteers. Troop members work on developing their skills in camping, swimming, citizenship, communication, conservation, cooking, community living, first aid and a wide variety of other areas, and usually earn merit badges when they have demonstrated mastery of the skills that are required for a particular activity.
  • Special Preschools (1)
    HD-1800.6500-870

    Special Preschools

    HD-1800.6500-870

    Programs that provide educational experiences and activities that are especially designed to meet the needs of young children who are at risk for disabilities or who have been identified as having a disability and who would benefit from a structured preschool setting which focuses on social, emotional and physical development in addition to pre-academic skills. Services generally include an assessment of the child's strengths and weaknesses and the development and implementation of an individualized plan to help the child develop confidence, self-esteem and appropriate social skills.
  • Specialized Adoption Programs (1)
    PH-0300.8100

    Specialized Adoption Programs

    PH-0300.8100

    Programs that specialize in handling adoptions for specific populations (e.g., children with special needs, foreign-born infants/children, or adoptions in which the race/cultural background of the child and the adopting parents are different); and/or adoptions in which there are arrangements for exchange of information and contact between birth families and adoptive families prior to the adoption and/or after the adoption has been finalized (in contrast to traditional or closed adoptions in which no information is shared and adoption information is confidential).
  • State/Local Health Insurance Programs (4)
    NL-5000.8000

    State/Local Health Insurance Programs

    NL-5000.8000

    Programs that provide health insurance for people who do not qualify for Medicaid, do not have access to insurance provided by an employer or cannot afford privately purchased health insurance. Services covered by these programs vary by state but generally include hospitalization, physician services, emergency room visits, family planning, immunizations, laboratory and x-ray services, outpatient surgery, chiropractic care, prescriptions, eye exams, eye glasses and dental care. Other services may include alcohol and drug treatment, mental health services, medical and equipment and supplies and rehabilitative therapy. Eligibility requirements also vary. Included are state and/or local government health insurance programs which may be administered by the state or at the local level, and public/private partnerships between state and/or local government entities and health insurance companies or other private organizations. Health care is generally provided through participating managed care plans in the area.
  • Well Baby Care (2)
    LF-7000.9500

    Well Baby Care

    LF-7000.9500

    Programs that provide health screening and immunization services for infants and toddlers to ensure their physical well-being and healthy development. Preschool aged children are also eligible in some areas.
  • Wellness Programs (1)
    LH-2700.9500

    Wellness Programs

    LH-2700.9500

    Programs that offer individual and/or group sessions which assist participants to understand how their lifestyle impacts their physical and mental health and to develop personal practices that enhance their total well-being. Wellness programs are holistic and combine a variety of components which may include a general physical examination that is tailored to the individual's needs; an evaluation of the person's pattern of exercise, eating habits, sources of stress and other lifestyle elements that are potential risk factors; and the development and implementation of an individualized plan for prevention management and early intervention to optimize health and performance which may include physical fitness sessions, nutrition counseling, stress reduction techniques, biofeedback, practice in assuming responsibility for one's choices, and other specific measures for avoiding physical and mental health problems.
  • Youth Enrichment Programs (25)
    PS-9800.9900

    Youth Enrichment Programs

    PS-9800.9900

    Programs that offer a wide variety of activities including arts and crafts, academic programs, sports, reading clubs, workshops and other recreational, leisure, cultural, social and civic activities for school-age children and youth in out-of-school hours. The objective of youth enrichment programs is to promote healthy social interaction and help participants maximize their social, emotional, physical and academic potential.
 
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